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Huawei V.S. US Politicians

Alexander Jansiewicz, Staff Writer

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If you’re familiar with the tech-savvy side of our planet, then there’s a chance that you might’ve heard of Huawei. Huawei is a Chinese technology and telecommunications company that primarily sells phones, tablets, PCs, smart home devices, and even wearable technology, like smart watches. As of now, Huawei is very popular with many countries around the world, primarily dominating Asia, and they’ve made great amounts of profit selling their phones. However, the United States Government isn’t very trustful when it comes to Huawei.

Government officials from Washington are urging AT&T to cut any beneficial ties with Huawei as a requisite to get Huawei out of the U.S. market. The warning came after President Trump strengthened security policies as a response to several issues; these include Beijing’s role in restraining North Korea, Chinese efforts to commandeer U.S. strategic industries, or even the efforts to restrain the terror caused by North Korea’s nuclear threats.

Although many at Huawei disagree with his opinions, Richard Yu, a representative for Huawei, prominently believes that the U.S. government banned their products strictly because Huawei is “too competitive” for the U.S. Chen Lifang, Huawei’s corporate senior vice president and director of Huawei’s board, stated the following about the U.S.’s block on Huawei and Richard Yu’s comments:

“Huawei, including company chairwoman and CEO, have never authorized him to comment on U.S. issues on behalf of the company. And we have never authorized Richard Yu to take on PR responsibilities… For now, the U.S government didn’t choose Huawei but we have patience to let consumers know us better and we remain open and transparent with the U.S. government as long as they’re willing to communicate with us.”

 

Both sides have arguments of which are both extremely reasonable. It makes sense that the U.S. Government is banning Huawei’s products; threats from North Korea have put tension on the U.S., and they don’t want their economy and trade market to be severely dependent on other countries. Huawei also has good philosophies too. Executives like Richard Yu understand that the U.S. doesn’t need more competition to influence its economy. The rest of Huawei, however, is patient enough; they want the U.S. to better understand and recognize the capability of their devices, and they’re willing to talk peacefully with the United States whenever possible. The tension in the United States has been at a high point, unfortunately, so it could mean that Huawei will have to wait a long time until they can start selling in the U.S.

Picture from Amazon

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