Yemenite Children Affair Conspiracy

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Yemenite Children Affair Conspiracy

Daniel Carvalheiro-Santos, Staff Writer

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I’ve been told that a parent’s greatest fear is the loss of a child, but in the heart of many Israeli parents lies deep despair and anger over “dead” sons and daughters that many have never even met. In the late 1940s and early 1950s, there was a wave of migration to Israel of Jewish people from majority Arab and Muslim nations in the Middle East. These people searched for hope and liberty from the discrimination occurring in Middle Eastern countries. Among the many migrants were a large number of pregnant women.  These migrant pregnant women in the villages and cities, particularly Yemenite, started losing their children during childbirth. Many learned to face the reality of their loss, however, others refused to accept the unexplainable deaths of their children. For many years, theories of what really occurred brewed under the cloak of  conspiracy. This year, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has reopened the case, and he has appointed his Minister in the Prime Minister’s Office to re-examine the controversy. Although many attempts to reopen the case have been made, all examinations have led to the conclusion that many of the children had truly died during or shortly after childbirth.

The case being reopened brings hope to many families who have managed to hold on to what little hope they can. One woman, Jacqueline Fedida, believes her son was kidnapped and taken from her, and she has compelling evidence to prove her claim. She says that when she was in the hospital, sedated from medication she took while in labor, she was told her son had died. When asked if she could see her son, the nurse replied, “we threw him away lady”. Fedida believes in her heart that her son was taken from her. Her hopes her son had survived grew when she received a certificate of death stating the child had died a week after his birth. Unfortunately, Jacqueline Fedida doesn’t remember much from that day, but she does have a slight recollection of being asked to sign papers. Not speaking a word of Hebrew (she was a migrant), she signed the papers hesitantly. Today, she believes she signed her son’s adoption papers.

There are many conspiracies to where these children may have gone. Many people believe that the children were illegally given to Holocaust survivors in eastern Europe who were unable to have children or lost their own. Wherever these children may be, one truth remains:  this treatment of migrant Jewish people was unjust and unnecessary.  It has become yet another example of racial and religious intolerance, one of so many in recent history. After so many years of questions, mothers and fathers deserve answers.

Photo Credits- The Times of Israel

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